73 and still gardening

Posts tagged “white flower(s)

A Cheerful 2015 with Gerbera

Welcome 2015!

gerbera-cornsilk

I’m hoping that everyone will have a cheerful new year…

gerbera-whitesmoke

so I’m sharing a variety of vibrant Gerbera flowers to brighten up the first day of the year.

gerbera-cream

This year is promising for my new garden residents – the beautiful Gerbera plants.
gerbera-pastelyllw

(My long time plant buddy/dealer Fronia delivered eleven of these beauties last December 1 and an additional seven last December 9, 2014 straight from a flower farm in Davao.)

gerbera-xanthicylw
Some curious people think the blooms are made of synthetic materials because the size of the flowers are 7.5 cm to 10 cm…
gerbera-lemonade
I really hope the blooms will be larger after they have adapted to their new environment.
gerbera-coral
Anyway, I’m glad that the stingless bees love the vibrant flowers…
gerbera-bloodorange
These plants have no name-tags so I decided to name them with descriptive colors.
gerbera-nacarat
What I like about these plants are: [1] They bloom in a variety of colors – whites, creams, yellows, oranges, reds, pinks, purples, and bi-colors (except true blues and purples);
gerbera-radicalred
[2] They produce pretty large flowers;
gerbera-ponceau
[3] They are low maintenance plants;
gerbera-cottoncandy
[4] They grow well in a tropical garden (like mine);
gerbera-pastelpink
[5] They look good in containers as well as in flower beds;
gerbera-pomelopink
[6] They are nice cut flowers… florists say Gerbera ranks number 5 in the most popular cut flowers;
gerbera-magenta
[7]  They are perennials… that is, they bloom many times in a year;
gerbera-fashionfuschia

[8] They attract birds, bees AND friends (old and new)…
gerbera-jazzberry

Thanks for Visiting

and

Have A Prosperous New Year


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Wordless Wednesday: Scarlet Star Guzmania

I’ve have variety of Guzmanias ages ago before this plant became a fad here in Lanao del Norte. I remember that most of my collection came from Camp Phillips in Bukidnon during the 1970’s to 80’s. I retained the one in the photos because of the vibrant color of its bracts…


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Bird’s Nest Pincushion Cactus

I guess the sparrows would agree with me if I say that Mammillaria decipiens ssp. camptotricha is not a comfortable plant to handle. This spiny green globular cactus is presently about 5 inches tall and 6 inches wide (it hasn’t achieved its maturity, yet). It also looks like a nest guarded with lots of needles. Hence, its common name Bird’s Nest Cactus, Bird’s Nest Mammillaria or Bird’s Nest Pincushion.

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The green tubercles of this plant are about 2 cm long. Its axil is somewhat lightly covered with white hairs and a few bristles. The protruding needles in the photos are its radial spines which compensate for its lack of central spines. Each tubercle has 2 to 8 radial spines about 3 cm long. Those sharp-edge needles are either thin or thick; flexible or rigid; curled or straight; yellow, white, or brown in color.

In between those tubercles bloom the small white flowers about 1 cm to 1.5 cm wide. (I noticed that this cactus flower in dry and wet season.) Despite its plain appearance, those blossoms have a delicate scent which attracts some ants or stingless bees. In addition, its juicy fruits often look like eye-candy to humans and birds alike.

101_1473

I like this succulent because it doesn’t demand a lot of care; it’s happy growing in a sandy-loam soil mixed with rice hulls. It also just require a full sun exposure and moderate water to thrive well. However during wet season, I have to move it to a dry spot to avoid drowning and rotting.


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Wordless Wednesday: Sea Urchin Cactus

It’s the third time in 2011 that my favorite cactus flowered; it bloomed in February and in May earlier this year. I noticed that every time this particular Sea Urchin Cactus (Echinopsis subdenudata) blooms, it is always on a rainy day/night. It’s frustrating that it stays open for only 24 hours or so. Because of the wind and rain, I failed to see its flowers open in the evening. However, I could still admire its beauty and oh-so sweet perfume in its remaining blooming hours in the morning up to 12 noon. I guess the bees would agree with me…


Torenia fourneri in bloom

double purple

hot pink on white

blushing pink on white

I got my wish granted. The other week as I was tending my orchids, I saw a single flower peeking in between the pots of Vanda teres. I was so glad for it is a hot pink variety of my Bluewings plants (Torenia fourneri). So, I immediately secured and bagged the herbaceous bluewings surrounding it. And surprise, surprise… After a couple of days, a stalk bloomed with a paler version of the hot-pink. It’s the palest pink I’ve seen so far on Torenias and I have to get closer to it to see its tint.  This species is a perennial; yet, somehow the plant manages to give surprises every now and then. Its flowers are white-plus and the plus could be a variety of hues from blue, purple and pink.

bluer and blue

just lovely flowers in bloom

blue on white

free-blooming perennial


Blooming Spider Cactus

Gymnocalycium denudatum

If I don’t have my eyeglasses on while tending to my cacti, I would see a bunch of small white spiders creeping on my Gymnocalycium denudatum. I would often confuse the spines for bugs attacking the cream-white flowers. Well, I guess that is why they obviously call this succulent as Spider Cactus due to the way its white spines look like — spider legs that cling close to the body of the plant.  (See the photo below.) 

harmless spines

The dark green body of my Spider cactus is glossy and globular, about 4 inches tall and 3 1/2 inches wide. It is “slightly chinned” and has eight rounded ribs. Each spines are about a centimeter long and not injurious.

6 cm wide white flower

The Spider Cactus is very easy to grow. It requires full sunlight, enough water and a dose of fertilizer to yield cream-white flowers with some rosy tinge at the edge. Depending on the size of the cactus, the flowers are about 5 – 7 cm wide.


Kumintang flowers

These are the update photos of my periwinkle (Catharanthus roseus). Locally known as Kumintang, I initially got the specimens as “souvenirs” from my friend Mrs. Tolero when she visited Malaysia. Among these pretty flowers, I especially like the ‘Peppermint Cooler’, the white flowers with a red dot at the center.