73 and still gardening

Posts tagged “pink flower(s)

A Cheerful 2015 with Gerbera

Welcome 2015!

gerbera-cornsilk

I’m hoping that everyone will have a cheerful new year…

gerbera-whitesmoke

so I’m sharing a variety of vibrant Gerbera flowers to brighten up the first day of the year.

gerbera-cream

This year is promising for my new garden residents – the beautiful Gerbera plants.
gerbera-pastelyllw

(My long time plant buddy/dealer Fronia delivered eleven of these beauties last December 1 and an additional seven last December 9, 2014 straight from a flower farm in Davao.)

gerbera-xanthicylw
Some curious people think the blooms are made of synthetic materials because the size of the flowers are 7.5 cm to 10 cm…
gerbera-lemonade
I really hope the blooms will be larger after they have adapted to their new environment.
gerbera-coral
Anyway, I’m glad that the stingless bees love the vibrant flowers…
gerbera-bloodorange
These plants have no name-tags so I decided to name them with descriptive colors.
gerbera-nacarat
What I like about these plants are: [1] They bloom in a variety of colors – whites, creams, yellows, oranges, reds, pinks, purples, and bi-colors (except true blues and purples);
gerbera-radicalred
[2] They produce pretty large flowers;
gerbera-ponceau
[3] They are low maintenance plants;
gerbera-cottoncandy
[4] They grow well in a tropical garden (like mine);
gerbera-pastelpink
[5] They look good in containers as well as in flower beds;
gerbera-pomelopink
[6] They are nice cut flowers… florists say Gerbera ranks number 5 in the most popular cut flowers;
gerbera-magenta
[7]  They are perennials… that is, they bloom many times in a year;
gerbera-fashionfuschia

[8] They attract birds, bees AND friends (old and new)…
gerbera-jazzberry

Thanks for Visiting

and

Have A Prosperous New Year

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Adenium obesum ‘PATHUM MA’

pathum ma
This one is my bestseller — Adenium obesum Pathum Ma. It’s flowers have triple layers of soft pink petals; flower diameter is 7cm to 8cm. I highly recommend this succulent to novice gardeners because it’s easy to care and it’s blooming capability is high.


Pink popcorn



I was never successful with Begonias in the past. Back then (in 1970’s), my sister Alet and I garden-hopped in Bukidnon just to search for these beauties. Unfortunately, I’ve managed to kill my Begonia collection.

Last month, I decided to grow Begonias again when my daughter pointed out several varieties at Boging’s garden.  A pot was not enough; so,  I ended up with 10 varieties.  One of my favorites was the pink flowers shown in the photos above. My grand kids were amused with the plant’s flowers. They thought they looked like pink popcorns.


Philippine wax flowers

Sunshine is delicious,
rain is refreshing,
wind braces us up,
snow is exhilirating;
there is really no such thing as bad weather,
only different kinds of good weather.

-John Rushkin


Euphorbia trapifolia

May 9, 2011

Ever, my colleague and plant buddy, gave me a cutting of Euphorbia trapifolia last May 2011. I must admit that I was not attracted with it. Still, I potted it with a sandy-loam soil and gave it a spot a semi-shady area.

so pretty this year

After two weeks,  it produced an offshoot. I transferred this plant (with its offshoot)  in my upper garden where it’s exposed to partial shade in the morning and sunlight in the afternoon. It also gets occasional rain during the wet season.

So far, the plant’s growth is moderate and it looks like an elongated Mammillaria cactus with all that tubercles on its stems. (The stems are around 2-3 cm in diameter.) It started out with 6 fleshy leaves; now, most of the tubercles have cuneate leaves with wavy-like indentations at the tip. Presently, my Euphorbia trapifolia is about 6 inches tall; the offshoot is about 2 inches. How tall would it be when it reaches its maximum growth?…that I still have to find out…

pink-tipped inflorescence


My new African Violets

One of my new year’s resolution for this year is NOT to buy plants. I even warned my orchid dealer Sopronia to refrain from bringing me new varieties of orchids. However, I was unable to keep this resolution when my plant buddies (Hermie and Tasing) dropped by late afternoon last Sunday. Hermie was back from the U.S. (she was there for more than 3 months) and it was nice of her to bring me these beauties from Manila – five pretty varieties of Saintpaulia.

photo of me unwrapping my new African Violets

I didn’t mind that each small pot was unlabelled… I’ll look up their names later on the internet… Meanwhile, enjoy these beauties with me…

light pink petals

maroon colored-petals

lavender petals with purple colored-edge

purple petals

another shade of pink


Image

October first-time bloomers

For nearly five months since it arrived in my garden, I’ve been talking to a certain Phalaenopsis to show me her flowers. I guess the orchid finally obliged to my request and surprised me with its first blooms — large (about 6 inches wide) pink flowers. This was just a nondescript air-plant at Hermie’s garden so I didn’t know it’s a hybrid until it produced buds.

I must admit that I’ve struggled to make this orchid bloom. I’ve been moving it around my garden to find a safe place away from the snails. (Some unwelcome snails managed to munch two of the buds; how they ever got to a hanging plant…I could only speculate.) Also, the excessive rain in the past weeks threatened the buds to droop.

In addition, here’s the other first-time bloomers this October: