Daisy plants

A Cheerful 2015 with Gerbera

Welcome 2015!

gerbera-cornsilk

I’m hoping that everyone will have a cheerful new year…

gerbera-whitesmoke

so I’m sharing a variety of vibrant Gerbera flowers to brighten up the first day of the year.

gerbera-cream

This year is promising for my new garden residents – the beautiful Gerbera plants.
gerbera-pastelyllw

(My long time plant buddy/dealer Fronia delivered eleven of these beauties last December 1 and an additional seven last December 9, 2014 straight from a flower farm in Davao.)

gerbera-xanthicylw
Some curious people think the blooms are made of synthetic materials because the size of the flowers are 7.5 cm to 10 cm…
gerbera-lemonade
I really hope the blooms will be larger after they have adapted to their new environment.
gerbera-coral
Anyway, I’m glad that the stingless bees love the vibrant flowers…
gerbera-bloodorange
These plants have no name-tags so I decided to name them with descriptive colors.
gerbera-nacarat
What I like about these plants are: [1] They bloom in a variety of colors – whites, creams, yellows, oranges, reds, pinks, purples, and bi-colors (except true blues and purples);
gerbera-radicalred
[2] They produce pretty large flowers;
gerbera-ponceau
[3] They are low maintenance plants;
gerbera-cottoncandy
[4] They grow well in a tropical garden (like mine);
gerbera-pastelpink
[5] They look good in containers as well as in flower beds;
gerbera-pomelopink
[6] They are nice cut flowers… florists say Gerbera ranks number 5 in the most popular cut flowers;
gerbera-magenta
[7]  They are perennials… that is, they bloom many times in a year;
gerbera-fashionfuschia

[8] They attract birds, bees AND friends (old and new)…
gerbera-jazzberry

Thanks for Visiting

and

Have A Prosperous New Year

Advertisements
Home, Uncategorized

Philippine wax flowers

Sunshine is delicious,
rain is refreshing,
wind braces us up,
snow is exhilirating;
there is really no such thing as bad weather,
only different kinds of good weather.

-John Rushkin

Succulents

Yellow Tower Cactus in bloom

I’ve been checking on them since this morning, yet…the ants beat me to the flowers of my Yellow Torch Cactus (Parodia leninghausii).  I was so excited to see its yellow flowers again for they only bloom once a year in my upper garden.

Succulents

In mood for Adeniums








I told my plant dealers that I would lie low on buying orchids… However, I didn’t anticipate my purchasing impulse on Adeniums. Just look at those double-petaled beauties… no plant-loving mortal could resist taking them home…and yes, I brought home seven potted plants (Adeniums with Greek nicknames).

Home

Tillandsia on bloom

The kiss of the sun for pardon,
The song of the birds for mirth,
One is nearer God’s heart in a garden
Than anywhere else on earth.

~Dorothy Frances Gurney, “Garden Thoughts”

Uncategorized

At Boging’s Garden

Meet Boging, a plant enthusiast/finder/dealer. I met her around 2005 when Tubod, LDN experienced a cacti craze; she gladly took off  several varieties of succulents from my garden. She’s been to remote private gardens or plant farms in the countryside. Hence, she’s aware of the latest plant craze in various regions for whenever there’s a town fiesta, Boging and her team would be there.

Here are some green residents in her garden:

Ferns and Mosses

Rock Tassel Fern

Cool and Interesting — that’s what I thought when I saw this Club Moss plant at Angelina’s garden last 2004 (Maliwanag, Baroy, Lanao del Norte).  Its dangling fur-like stems swayed along with the  breeze. So without further ado, I asked my young friend (Angelina Avila) to give me some stem cuttings of  Lycopodium squarrosum (rock tassel fern) and Huperzia squarrosa (fine rock tassel fern). [The latter died shortly due to direct sunlight exposure and lack of moisture…and yes, my ignorance of its proper care.]

My Rock Tassel Fern is about nine years old in my garden; the old stems turn into brown color (shown in above photo) while new ones are vibrant green (photos below).   This plant loves moisture so I regularly check or change the peat moss. Also, I give slow-release fertilizer once in three months.


I potted this one last year; so far, its happy growing under shade of my mango tree.

Related Post:  Lycopodium squarrosum http://typicalgardener.wordpress.com/2011/04/07/lycopodium-squarrosum/